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Glenn Beck

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America 18, Timothy Mcveigh 10, Us 9, Martin Luther King 6, Glenn 5, Dr. King 4, Robert George 4, Ted Nugent 4, Dr. Martin Luther King 4, Martin Luther 4, Oklahoma City 4, Manhattan 4, Washington 4, Mississippi 3, Princeton 3, Clinton 2, Dr. Alveda King 2, Alabama 2, Alveda 2, United States 2,
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  FOX News    Glenn Beck    News/Business. Guests discuss the day's top  
   political, entertainment and business stories.  

    April 24, 2010
    9:00 - 10:00pm EDT  

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glenn every day i end this program with a statement from gandhi. use truth 80s anvil, nonviolence as the hammer and anything that doesn't bring truth hammer and rejected. tonight it is time to find out why. hello, america. i was talking to a friend of mine and we were talking about the constitution and some of the bills being passed in congress and i said that is 2800-pages. the constitution is four. when they wrote it out -- granted they were giant pieces of paper, but four.
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out of all of the things that the founders could have tackled first, what did they say? we're going to make promises to the states. we willle never violate these things. what was the first thing they chose? the first amendment, congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion. freedom of religion. freedom of speech. speech and religion, number one. i don't think it was because a won a coin toss against excessive bail. i think they did it because it was the most important right to protect because of where they came from. they had just come from a country where you couldn't have that freedom. you couldn't choose your own religion or speak out against the government or the religion because they were one and if you did you better watch your back. also they knew history always repeats itself.
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history always repeats itself. i mean the the people might be different and the cause might be different but at some point somebody is going to say you know what, i got a right. and you need to have free speech. we have an hour coming up for you next week. i'm changing the show. i told you a little bit about last night. i'm changing the show because it is just something is bothering me and it is just not right and i think i know what it is. next week we are going to do a special on something you probably never heard of in history. it was called the black robe regimen. they were the local pastors. they were the ones that stood up and said you have a right, god gave you these rights. they were the people that rallied the congregations after the shot was heard around the world when the british killed 18 church going americans at lexington green, the pattern continued. the ministers and pastors
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rallied the citizens to the cause. these were the men and women of faith. gosh. gosh, almost like these guys in the 1960s. these are the people are faith that rallied people and taught them truth prior to the distortion of the gospel that we have today that we now know as social justice. social justice, you might think it means one thing but believe me, there are many in america who know exactly what it means and it has nothing to do with jesus. these are people who knew what was at stake. they also knew in their day that man would be individually judged. the choices that they made would affect the rest of their life and reflect in the eyes of god. this weighed heavily on the men of faith. samuel adams. he made jerry fallwell look like, you know, what is the wheel chair buy it tha guy thae
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pornos? he was intense. they were faith driven people. and because of that their decisions were easy because they understood honor and duty. when ben franklin was asked, you know, what is the religion of america he said the religion of america is easy, we believe there is a god, we believe we are going to die and we going to see him and he will say what the heck have you been doing and the best way to please god is to serve others, do good to man. these guys did good to man because they were fighting for freedom. these guys were fighting for freedom. what better way to serve man than fight for or protect or speak out for freedom. congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or prohibiting the preexercise thereof.
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the founders had fled an ideology that believed that societies in order to function had to have some sort of uniformity. get into church, we will tell you what it is, by the way, church and state, it is great, isn't it. it was the duty of the government to impose it, even using force, save the souls. you better not be a conformist. you would be executed. now, here in america god bless the founders. you can be a wiccan, a mormon, a presbyterian, you be a nut job. what was it jefferson said, if it neither breaks my leg nor picks my pocket what difference does it make to me. the government can't throw you to the lions. neither will they abridge freedom of speech. this wasn't so the porn stars could express themselves. the founders came from a system that permiated the entire
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world. the average slub back then, you had no say. you needed to be a duke or earl or king, wear a fancy wig to have anything to say. the first amendment not only gave the schlub a seat at the table but put that schlub at the head of the table. you are in charge, not the king. that was radical. also, couldn't abridge freedom of the press. oh, the press. why would they do that? because they had this cute little idea that the press would stay independent. the founders knew that power corrupts. that is why the constitution is a charter of negative liberties. much to the president's chagrin, i'm sorry, president obama, but that is what it is. it says what the government can't do to you. it will never take these rights away from you. that is a good thing.
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the press is in the first amendment because in the off chance that a government might become too bloated, too powerful, out of control you would have an outside force coupled with these people and they would hold the government accountable. you know what happened? the press first ripped these people apart and then the press went wait a minute, wait a minute, i think they're right. what else is in this? the press. freedom of speech. freedom of religion. and the right of the people to peacefully assemble. can you imagine today, an america that didn't have the tea party. i know there is a lot of people going, yeah, i can. most of them are at the white house which is strange. the president had no road blocks and nothing stood in his way. he could pass whatever he wanted. the only thing slowing him down
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are the peaceful assembly of the tea parties and at least this building and the press. it is pretty amazing. you and one building full of journalists, that's it. and look at the difference you have made. and then the last thing, first amendment. this is the most important stuff. and the petition to petition the government for redress of grievances. what does that mean? is that that people are allowed to get signatures. >> it means you a right to say what the hell are you doing? that is your right. but whateverry single one of these rights there is an implied responsibility. you have a right to religion. practice any faith. don't kill people in the name of it. two, prohibiting the free exercise thereof of bridging freedom of speech. you have a right to free speech. don't cry "fire" in a crowded movie theater. be peaceful and assemble.
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do it. don't become the g 20 people. and to petition the government with redress of grievances. you go to them with respect and you demand an answer. i think the only one that doesn't have an implied responsibility with it is this one. petition. i think the responsibility is on the government's shoulders. they have a responsibility to answer our damn questions! they work for us. so here we are at the end of the constitutional convention now. ben franklin is sick, he's old, he's in pain, 81 years old. he had been sitting in a chair. he couldn't move. he gets up and he leaves. and on the way out because people didn't know, what are we going to have. are we going back to a king? people wanted to make george, washington, king so they said mr. franklin, what did you give us, a republic or a monarchy?
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>> franklin responded a republic if you can keep it. if you can keep it. none of us really ever realized -- at least i didn't, maybe you did -- i didn't realize how fragile this thing was until september 11th. made me pay attention. we weren't promised that life was going to be easy. we weren't promised happiness. we were promised the ability to pursue it. no one said you would get there. no one said it would be easy. in fact the founders didn't think it would even last this thing. franklin's response seems to indicate that was the sentiment of the room that day and that was day number one and they were counting them day by day. marcamerica here we are on day 81,209 of the american experiment and some where and i can pinpoint i think kind of in the decade but i don't think i can get any closer to that,
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some where during those 80,000 days we started taking for granted the gift that we were given. we dropped the ball. it's our fault, too. the press dropped the ball. they're still dropping the ball. thenmy is not the republicans. it's not the democrats. it's not the president. it's none of it. it is a distortion of the truth. that is the enemy. that somehow or another big government is good. that's not true. the founders have been proven right over and over and over again. when the government gets too big or out of control, it always ends the same way and it is not a happy ending. we're putting a documentary out called "progressivism: america's cancer ." an in depth look at how progress ives threw america way off track. you will get important historical information that you don't see anyplace else and i'm
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going to start asking you to do a few things every day because you need to get up off the couch. and i don't mean go stand in a crowded tea party. i mean you have got to start learning our own history and making a choice, do i stand for it or not? before you get off the couch, though, and stand up, you need to get ton your knees, you got to get on your knees before september 11th and i know that is a big ask. lines are being drawn in america. the media it seems has picked a side. we are told again and again how the tea parties are dangerous, you just can't trust those moms with childrens. the grand parents, they might run you over with their motorized cart or pelt you with their werther's originals. what about the guys. we had loaded guns on the
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capital grounds. democrats. republicans. everybody will admit that is dangerous really. no, i didn't think americans are like the idiots overseas that fair their guns into the air to celebrate. i think we understand as a physics difference, the bull lets come down. the press is quick to point out when someone is packing a weapon and you have all these people standing there protesting with guns, loaded guns, did anybody point out, i mean there is an obvious contradiction staring them in the eye. supposed to be a crowd of out of control antigovernment mobsters packing loaded weapons and yet there wasn't even a good old fashioned pistol whipping. what is up with that? nothing happened except the most important thing. people exercised their right to peacefully assemble and speak out. yet, we have a former president tell us on the anniversary of the oklahoma city bombing that
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speech is somehow or another dangerous. no, it is not. it is essential. timothy mcveigh was a certifiable nut job. i don't know a single person in the tea party that will go oh, that timothy mcveigh. what he did isn't protected by the first amendment or any of the amendments. whey do, what rush does, what bill clinton does, what barack obama does, what you do, that is protected. speech. standing up. the problem is we forget our own history and so it could be used against us. you got to learn it. the anniversary of the oklahoma city bombing was also another big anniversary of something that is directly related. waco. why did timothy mcveigh do it? in his distorted mind he committed an inexcusable act.
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why? because he said he was angry at an out of control government at waco that could kill women and children all in the name of protecting women and children. it didn't make any sense. i'm not crazy and that doesn't make sense. he was and it didn't make sense. i'm not arguing whether clinton should have gone into the compound or whatever, history, you decide that for yourself. i bring this up because it is important for you to understand, you need to understand waco and oklahoma city. the former president was out there condemning the tea parties and saying the next timothy mcveigh is being raised up from the tea party movement. this is the same president who was the one timothy mcveigh was pissed at because he was the guy that issued the order to go into the compound. it ended horribly. i don't think president clinton wanted it to end that way, i'm
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not saying that. here comes the president blaming the oklahoma city bombing on people like rush limbaugh for questioning the government and bill clinton as president acting what many people think recklessly which resulted in the the deaths of women and children. for the first time in my life, i think, at least my recollection we are being told by a former president and we are expected to believe that words about the government acting recklessly are more dangerous than the government actually acting recklessly. do the math on that one. their defense is that speech caused timothy mcveigh, not the action by the government, no. speech. the truth? only one thing caused timothy mcveigh. timothy mcveigh. not clinton. not reno. not rush. not you. not me. not speech. not religion.
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nothing. timothy mcveigh. but by getting you to argue this it brings you off the point of the real issue. an out of control government and your right. david caresch, nut job. timothy mcveigh, nut job. what journalists should be doing is exercising their right, their responsibility and their duty. you have the g 20 po 20 protes, violent. it was the left who got violent at town halls. ann coulter forced not to speak up in canada. threat -- left threatened the event. no one seems to be afraid of the left in the media. why? whenever there is violence it seems to come from the the left. they don't have the exclusive handle on it. it comes from the right too. it many coulds from people but the constant media drum beat is to watch out wit for the soccer
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moms with the strollers and the grandparents with the lethal dentures. they could strike at any moment. the good news is if you know history you will see it as pattern and just repeats itself over and over and over again. it gives you the way out and that is what this show is tonight, the way out through history. martin luther king, do you know what the press says about martin luther king now? do you know what the press said about martin luther king then? how about this one. washington fears violence in march. whoa. 1967. by preaching civil disobedience over the years dr. king may have unwittingly helped gave the road to violence. america tea party goers, you are in good company. standing up against the government, a government that
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you feel is grabbing too much nower or is out of control, if you do it peacefully you are in good company and so far that is the only evidence they have. peace. i would urge the media and those in washington to watch tonight. i think washington and the media might need a little reflesher on their rights, their responsibilities, their duty and free speech. you -- you i think you should watch because i think you are going to feel empowered by the truth tonight. right back.
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glenn i have to tell you
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sometimes this job sucks beyond belief. other times it is the coolest job in the world. tonight, i was telling -- i was telling my niece, i said tonight i get to go home and say to my wife i spent an hour with martin luther king, jr.'s niece, a rock legend and one of the smartest guys i have ever met. joining me now, dr. alvetta king, pastoral associate at priest for life. she is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and music legend, this has never happened before, you keep your randy hands to yourself. >> your first date, glenn. >> ted nugent. >> and robert george. wow. here is why i have collected you three. i have collected you because dr. king, you know history, you
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were there. >> absolutely. martin luther king had it nailed. nug, you are an outspoken guy. i think a lot of people would go he is a gun nut. >> have you notice that? >> i have notice that. but youngster you are also dedo peace. >> nonviolence and peace and demonstrating we the people in the most peaceable way we can. >> and then i have robert george because robert, you are -- you are just -- you are a guy that consults with presidents and popes and is a big thinker and i thought you would also help kind of stitch all of this together so we could help the american people. >> thank you for inviting me on to the show, glenn. >> you get. let me start with dr. king. do you see parallels between the 1960s and today?
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>> there are parallels between the '60s and now. during the 1960s, people were being slaughtered and their lives were being taken. there was violence, greed, drugs were rising, just all of this and my uncle was saying you have got to come back to faith, hope and love. now, you get the translation say faith hope and charity, faith, hope and love and he got that from his father, daddy king and he got that from his ancestors. ju have to have faith. and you never lose hope. even when things are really bad there is always hope. today there is the same condition. people being slaughtered, war and rumors of war, abortion, drugs sicknesses, disease, all of this is going on. greed. america has just gone crazy with greed. i really have to say that. in the midst of all of this people care more about theirselves than others so the
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answer is going to always be the same. you have got to have faith. you have got to begin to continue to hope and not give up on others and then the other thing, you hate evil but you didn't hate the people that do evil. so hate goes out the window. >> let me go to you, ted, because that is where i think people confuse the truth with hate. i don't have -- if i met president obama, he is the president of the united states and he is a huma human being. >> you would be respectful. >> i don't hate the man. >> i'm honored to be here with dr. king and i think it is best to quote dr. martin luther king, jr. if i can get it accurate. those who engage in nonviolent direction action are not response inmates for the tension we are merely bringing to the surface the tension that already exists. that is the spirit where
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corruption metastasized if not monitored by the boss, we the people. the boss is coming in saying you guys are out of control. we want accountability and we want you to conduct your service in a respectable manner the way our families do and that is where you get peace and hope and faith. if there is tension we are not the cause. we are the monitors of tension and we want it reduced to a peaceful assembly. >> professor george, martin luther king if i'm not mistaken said he didn't mind tension. >> tension is necessary. >> but everybody else is trying to, well, you have bill clinton saying, you know, you can't speak out, you can't say these things, you have a responsibility. so in other words, if any nut job goes and grabs a gun then i'm responsible. >> you have an obligation to speak out. >> i have a duty. >> the question comes back am i my brother's keeper? of course, you are your brother's keeper. if you see your mother about to
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be harmed -- your brother about to be harmed you must speak out and you have to come out of yourself to do that. a selfish person says me and my home and no more and what happens to you is okay but it cannot be that way. >> professor george, if i could bring it up on the screen, the line from the manhattan doctrine. what you explain what the manhattan doctrine is? >> the manhattan declaration, glenn. and that was put together by leading catholic evangelical, protestant and eastern orthodox christians pledging to three great principles. one is the advantagity of human life and the dignity of marriage as the onye conjugal f woman and man. and it began with leading religion figures and now spread
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sunday a on the internet at www.manhattan -- >> i actually signed the document. >> she is one of 450,000 citizens. ordinary folks from all walks of life who joined the religion leaders in signing on. >> the reason i bring this up. pull the full screen up about cesar. this is your line, professor and i think this is unbelievable. talk. >> is that your line? >> i'm drawing it from the scripture, jesus said to render unto cesar that which is cesar but that to god which is gods. this was uttered by alveda's uncle who said there comes a point at which is law can be so
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unjust, it is necessary openly, lovingly to refuse to comply with an unjust law. >> civil disobedience. >> for a lot of people, me included abortion is murder and it just becomes clearer and clearer and the closer you get to birth. i think if you had a womb with a window it would never happen. >> absolutely. my uncle said that america will not reject racism until america sees racism. then you saw the guns and the dogs and the billy clubs. at priest or life, the father says america won't reject abortion until america sees abortion. we will be getting on a bus in a few weeks to do that prolife freedom rides and so what you have got, if you are slaughtering people because of skin color or gestational rage, it is still wrong. it is just wrong. >> when we come back, i have to
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ask you about that is such a clear cut case. what about the tea parties and what is going on? we'll go there, next.
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this is a fox news alert. i'm harris faulkner in new york. killer tornadoes moving across the south and new eastward, leaving at least ten people dead, including two children. dozens injured in mississippi alone. right now even in the darkness rescue crews working to find any one missing or trapped under fallen homes in west
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central, mississippi. twisters also hitting alabama, arkansas and louisiana. tennessee next to see the weather. watch for the latest next hour on "geraldo at large." also in that region tonight, the coast guard responding to a tank barge that has exploded on the mississippi river in louisiana south of baton rouge. the explosion reportedly happened while the barge was loading benzene. the fire is out, two people are hurt. don't know their conditions yet. we will bring you more on this as the story develops. i'm hair rus harris faulkner. now, let's get you back to "glenn beck." for all the latest news, log on to fox news.com. ♪ the negro citizens of montgomery, alabama, who return to the buses on a nonsegregated
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basis. >> i had a lady call me on my radio show today and it is a phone call i don't think i will ever forget. she was very passionate, god love her. she was passionate and she said glenn, tell us the way out. i can't figure it out, tell us the way out. i said i'm doing the best i can. and quite honestly if i can get all jesus with you here for a second. i feel god is a little cryptic at time. it is like figure it out, dummy. faith hope and charity are the tools he gave me. i'm circling around it. in about five minutes, i will lay something out. history is the answer. i will lay something out that i found today that we happen to have the perfect person to explain it to you. i'm with dr. alveda king, the
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niece of dr. martin luther king, jr., music legend ted nugent, gun lover and princeton university's robert george. professor, let me start with you. we know like we were talking a minute ago about abortion and people either feel -- if you think about it you generally go one way or the other and you are strong in that view. but that one is pretty easy for people. the media keeps looking at these tea parties and saying well, it is about high taxes, it is -- it is not. can you explain and disstill what people are feeling or what can you compare this to? how would you explain what people are gathering for? >> tea partyers see themselves in the tradition of the original boston tea party. what they are united in standing up for is the principle of constitutional
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government, the rule of law. in the united states under the the constitution we have this is the principle of limited government. i think people see that we are really here at a hinge, a hinge of history. we are going to go in one direction or the other. we are either going to go in the direction of european style social democracies or going to go back in the direction of limited government under our constitution. the tea partiers are clear about where they want to be. those who favor european style democracies are not bad people. it is a legitimate point of view. doesn't happen to be one that i share. the argument can be made but the argument can be made and it is powerful that tea parties are making that the real future for america is to go back in the direction of limited government restrained by the constitution. what the tea party is standing for is constitutional
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principle. it is about adhere lens to the constitution and the limited government. >> the tea party their battle cry is not coincidental that they rally against taxation without representation and that is such an egregious violation by the current government and has been metastasizing for years. certainly nobody can stand up and go they are spending our tax dollars really good. will is no accountability. that was the cry of the original tea party and it is the cry of this tea party. the government is out of control. the corruption is absolutely vulgar at this point. power corrupts. and there is way too much corrupted power. so we the people just like dr. martin luther king, jr. said stand up and monitor the government that is supposed to work for us. that is what the tea party represents. it is so simple it's stupid. >> so, dr. king, before i get to what i think dr. martin
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luther king did brilliantly, let's talk a little bit about the culture of the '60s. you talked about how it was out of control on all fronts and reflects today's culture in many ways. >> yes. >> but it was -- i don't -- i don't think -- i have never considered -- i have never considered going to jail before. i'm a law abiding citizen. i never considerd that. and my wife and i had a conversation recently going you know, i think those guys could just say you know what, something happened, you caused it, get your butt in jail and i started thinking about martin luther king. what was that like because you went to jail? >> i actually went to jail, too. my uncle martin went to jail several times. my father, his brother was jailed often, especially in birmingham. our home was bombed in
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birminghamle ham and all of that. we had a covenant or agreement that we would not be violent. one of my friends was thrown down by the police officers and they began to kick her and i went to rescue her and there was a to usle and i went to jail and i remember calling home crying and i said daddy, come and get me. he said take the night in jail and think about what nonviolence really means. i already knew but after that i was very committed because daddy meant it. my uncle martin meant it. to live in a time when you were jailed just because of the color of your skin and having the courage like the tea party people, i pray they don't end up in jail, speaking out with courage and conviction peacefully for what is right and that is why they went to jail. >> back in just a second.
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we're back with dr. alveda king, niece of dr. martin luther king, jr. music legend ted nugent and princeton university's robert george. i think we could do three hours here because we are running out of time. tomorrow i will take you to the chalk board. it is amazing. tell me what this is. >> this is a pledge that we made during the days of the civil rights movement. i have actually made the pledge myself and there are ten points if i can move quickly and you agree to meditate on the teachings of jesus every day. remember that the nonviolent movement seeks justice and reconciliation and not just victory. walk and talk in the manner of love or charity for god is love. pray daily to be used by god, sacrifice personal needs and so greed has to go out of the window. because you have to believe god is going to take care of you so you don't have to worry about that. observe with friend and foe the ordinary rules of the curvecy. seek to perform regular service
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for others and for the world. refrain from the violence of heart. and strive to be in good spiritual and bodily health and follow the directions of the movement and of the captain on a demonstrations. >> and if you marched you had to sign this. >> if you marched you had to sign it and to keep yourself according. >> i this is the kind of thing i think we need and i will be following this in the next few days. professor george you said something? >> i said that is beautiful, alveda. thank you for that. >> i'm going put that on my website. >> seeks justice and reconciliation, not victory. >> how about in today's world? >> justice means that we want life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all people. if people are downtrodded and mistreated it is our responsibility to speak out for
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not just ourselves but for others. we have to seek justice for everybody. >> recruitinreconciliation. victory means i'm write and you are wrong. recruiting sill vation with truth be the real winner. when truth emerges we reconcile ourself to truth and unity and in charity or in love. >> what alveda is saying here is rooted in the judaio christian nation. it is a remarkable teaching. not to destroy enemies but convert hearts and win people over to the cause of justice. >> sounds like the ten commandments and the golden rule. >> and the opposite of what malcolm x was doing and martin luther king. malcolm x fails, martin luther king succeeds. back in a second. 8(@0
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i have to apologize to all three of my guests because i have had one guest on this program that was a waste of an hour and if i could get that
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hour back i would put it on right now. dr. alveda king is with us. music legend ted nugent. princeton university's robert george. i only have three minutes and i apologize for bringing you in for this so short. i really thought if i could make the case people would wake up. >> they are. >> i know they are. i'm talking maybe i guess about the media. >> they aren't. >> they aren't. what -- how do you get people who just are still playing politics when you saw dogs attack, everybody in america went whoa, whoa. what is it going to take? >> when people saw the dogs, the gun, the billy club and the face of my father and my uncle and later on my face it caused the hearts to melt. the media has responsibility.
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they have to let the truth be seen and be told. we have to have shows like yours. we have to have internet streaming or truth out there. we have to have folks peacefully protesting telling the truth and the heart of america will begin to melt in the face of truth and charity. >> i think the far are left media represents the dogs attacking the protesters. >> they have to start telling the truth. >> the media did the same thing in the 1960s. >> and they would not report the truth. finally you had a few young members of the media who bravely began to say they are telling the truth and we need to show this and that is what happen. >> i can't thank you enough. we'll be back. god bless you. final thoughts in a second. @ú÷
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